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  • old timer
    started a topic SOG Knives

    SOG Knives

    Does anyone carry or use SOG fixed blades?
    or CRKT folders?

    I like the SOG line as well as some of the Gerber's when
    it comes to all purpose fixed blades. At least I can still
    afford those.

  • old timer
    replied
    ^ That's a good one.

    Tai Chi kept my grandmother young until shortly before she passed. Her flexibility and balance were both really helped by Tai Chi.

    I don't exactly know why she stopped practicing in the years before her passing. Both my father and I think that the down-turn in her health was in-part due to her cessation of Tai Chi, although it's hard to flush out that egg/chicken scenario.

    I've seen Tai Chi masters do some amazing things. :surp: :shock:

    Well, it's to not bad for an old half breed Onieda Indian.
    That's one of the rationale's behind my signature.

    Leave a comment:


  • tsiwrx
    replied
    ^ That's a good one.

    Tai Chi kept my grandmother young until shortly before she passed. Her flexibility and balance were both really helped by Tai Chi.

    I don't exactly know why she stopped practicing in the years before her passing. Both my father and I think that the down-turn in her health was in-part due to her cessation of Tai Chi, although it's hard to flush out that egg/chicken scenario.

    I've seen Tai Chi masters do some amazing things. :surp: :shock:

    Leave a comment:


  • old timer
    replied
    You sure your from the Cleveland area? Reason I ask that you make to much sense in your views.

    :lol: I've been in Cleveland since '97. Stalked my then-girlfriend, now-wife, here. :ewink: :egrin:


    I'm actually a first-generation Naturalized immigrant from Taiwan, of Chinese ancestry, who grew up in inner-city Baltimore and then northern Fulton county, Georgia. Talk about friends changing color overnight - I went from having all black friends to all white friends over the course of just one moon: the only thing that was consistent was that I was still the only Asian. :lol:

    One of the good things about my upbringing is that I don't see skin color - I just see people.


    At the moment I'm trying to learn Grand Master Wu Bin's Wu Shu under the direction of one of his masters. That plus working with a 5th Dan's program on weapons. But with bad knees and back coupled with old age it's a challenge. That's the main reason I try to stay out of the lime light so to speak. Just have to wait till they come into my reach, then do what I have to do so as not to be "victim." Or end up in some law court being sued or worst prosecuted for defending myself or family

    ^ I think the mindset is the most important part of the equation. It's something that I did not realize until becoming more involved in this community. We can all do *something* to lessen our chances of being a victim or to fight back when we are. As I like to say to my daughter, it's not about being the best, it's just about being a better person today than yesterday, and that it's a never ending road.

    In this respect, I've been very lucky to have happened upon some excellent instructors who have painted a realistic picture of the nastier side of human existence.

    I think Wu Shu is awesome - I might be biased based on my ethnicity, though. ops:

    You're right Wu Shu is awesome. My youngest daughter reached the brown belt level
    in Karate before switching. She was a few belts ahead of me, and now I'm trying
    my hand at Tai Chi. It's about all I can handle any more.

    And you right on with the color views, I've taught my kids that there are
    only 3 colors in this life that matters.

    Grey, Red, and Gold.

    Grey because it represents ones grey matter "BRAIN"

    Red, because it represents blood, they thing we all have
    in common. And need to live.

    Gold, because it represents wealth.

    So if you have a good heart pumping red to grey,
    then grey can work to help make you understand life
    and help you get the gold you may need for a good life.

    R

    Leave a comment:


  • tsiwrx
    replied
    You sure your from the Cleveland area? Reason I ask that you make to much sense in your views.

    :lol: I've been in Cleveland since '97. Stalked my then-girlfriend, now-wife, here. :ewink: :egrin:


    I'm actually a first-generation Naturalized immigrant from Taiwan, of Chinese ancestry, who grew up in inner-city Baltimore and then northern Fulton county, Georgia. Talk about friends changing color overnight - I went from having all black friends to all white friends over the course of just one moon: the only thing that was consistent was that I was still the only Asian. :lol:

    One of the good things about my upbringing is that I don't see skin color - I just see people.


    At the moment I'm trying to learn Grand Master Wu Bin's Wu Shu under the direction of one of his masters. That plus working with a 5th Dan's program on weapons. But with bad knees and back coupled with old age it's a challenge. That's the main reason I try to stay out of the lime light so to speak. Just have to wait till they come into my reach, then do what I have to do so as not to be "victim." Or end up in some law court being sued or worst prosecuted for defending myself or family

    ^ I think the mindset is the most important part of the equation. It's something that I did not realize until becoming more involved in this community. We can all do *something* to lessen our chances of being a victim or to fight back when we are. As I like to say to my daughter, it's not about being the best, it's just about being a better person today than yesterday, and that it's a never ending road.

    In this respect, I've been very lucky to have happened upon some excellent instructors who have painted a realistic picture of the nastier side of human existence.

    I think Wu Shu is awesome - I might be biased based on my ethnicity, though. ops:

    Leave a comment:


  • old timer
    replied
    You sure your from the Cleveland area? Reason I ask that you make to much
    sense in your views. At the moment I'm trying to learn Grand Master Wu Bin's
    Wu Shu under the direction of one of his masters. That plus working with a
    5th Dan's program on weapons. But with bad knees and back coupled with old age
    it's a challenge. That's the main reason I try to stay out of the lime light
    so to speak. Just have to wait till they come into my reach, then do what
    I have to do so as not to be "victim." Or end up in some law court being sued
    or worst prosecuted for defending myself or family

    Leave a comment:


  • tsiwrx
    replied
    ^ Nope, no LE experience, no military experience. I'm a nerdy biological scientist. :geek: Just trying to learn - like all the rest of us here - that's all.

    I was literally another person (less than half my age now :lol: , and ~80 lbs or so lighter ops: ) when I achieved black belt in one martial art, and I only re-started 4 years ago, but even then, it was sadly only sporadic. My family and I recently spent about 6 months with family TKD, and along with that, I also started Krav at the same gym. My daughter decided to quit TKD to further pursue her true love - piano - so we stopped going. I kept on only a few more weeks with Krav as I needed extensive oral reconstructive surgery to address a pair of injuries I received as a kid (at 9, I pretended to be a Thundercat and failed :lol: , at 16, I raced two female friends on my bike and performed an endo :lol: ), and as a result I've been off contact sports since last September. :cry:

    After the reconstruction is done and I have a custom mouth-piece fitted, I'd like to either continue with Krav or, more likely, pursue an integrated combatives gym locally.

    Those few force-on-force seminars I participated in taught me that, as you suggested above, it's more about solving the problem than anything else - and sometimes, that the best solution may not be to immediately try to access a tool, but rather, to either go hands-on or to simply beat feet the other way!

    Leave a comment:


  • old timer
    replied
    TSiWRX Don't know, you but you sound as if you've have LEO experience,
    and I must agree with you on a great many of your points. Hate to say this
    but it's another reason I've gone back to marshal arts. I've got a low belt
    ranking and have gone back to learning how to use Tonfa's (pr-24's) and a
    few other toys. BTW not very good with them as yet, but I'm learning.

    Leave a comment:


  • tsiwrx
    replied
    ^ No problem - glad to help. I've been out of the knife hobby for a while, now, so I'm no longer as familiar with the different brands/makes. ops:

    If you have the time/inclination to delve into the hobby, try attending some knife shows near where you live. The community is filled with great people, and at the shows, custom makers typically sell knives for a fraction of what they would otherwise cost on the open market. Similarly, many newer makers will attend such shows, and oftentimes, their goods can be had at very reasonable prices simply because the masses have not yet recognized their talent.

    If you go so far as to join various knife-enthusiast Forums, know that while most online trading/selling/purchasing is done with "collector" items that are blem-free, there are also those who will do the same with true "user" knives: if your intent is to use the knives and appreciate them in that way, deals are to be had there, too.
    To echo TSiWRX's sentiments, Kershaw has some great offerings at very decent price points. I have had Leeks and Scallions which are great knives. Their ZT line is very robust. I don't think I ever will break my 0350. It locks up like a fixed blade and feels like you could pry out nails with it.

    ^ You know, I thought about separating out the ZT line from the rest, but failed to do so. ops: Thank you for pointing that out!

    They're also definitely very knives for the price, and depending on what you're looking for, Old Timer, you might be interested in checking them out, too.


    -----

    Situational awareness is easier said than done. Anybody that says they are aware of their surroundings at all times is blowing smoke. Multitasking, rub your tummy and pat your head while adding a column of numbers.

    There are times that you don't have the choice in sitting at a round table in the middle of the restaurant with your back to the door. Just saying.

    Oh, no, I definitely agree.

    My mention of "situational awareness" should not be interpreted as somehow suggestive of it being a magical remedy, either.

    First and foremost, just as you wrote, I personally think it is impossible to maintain an increased level of alertness for any extended period of time without risking premature mental/physical fatigue - which itself would be counterproductive.

    In looking at my past posts throughout "gun-dom" - here, on OFCC, on XDTalk, DefensiveCarry.com and other such communities - I think it is clear to see that my outlook on "situational awareness" is nothing if not pragmatic, that in addition to the above realization, I've expressed similar sentiments as your when it came to cases such as that of the officers who died in CiCi's Pizza before the Wal-Mart shooting in Nevada or the innocents who have been injured in various iterations of "The Knockout Game" nationwide. Similarly, I've been among those who have directly questioned other's posts about being able to maintain distance from strangers while out in public - whether that was indeed realistic.

    My soul-searching question has always been "will I see it coming."

    What I wrote in the previous post regarding situational awareness and distance is just that - that there is a direct relationship between the two, and what's more, the statement also questions the logic that, had we already failed at the necessary situational awareness to keep the threat from closing distance, what is the likelihood that we are going to be able to reactively execute a draw, from concealment, and effect hits-on-target, in time for a physical assault that may well come from bad-breath distances (when we already know from the Tueller Drill that even at 21 feet, we're optimistic if we think we can actually escape without harm).

    The question I ask is whether if that expectation was realistic - or if by being "gun-centric" in our thoughts about self-defense that we are assigning way too much value to the gun.

    Leave a comment:


  • old timer
    replied
    Have you looked at the ESEE knives?




    No I haven't, but I will. Thank you for another company
    to look at and check out.

    Leave a comment:


  • old timer
    replied
    Situational awareness is easier said than done. Anybody that says they are aware of their surroundings at all times is blowing smoke. Multitasking, rub your tummy and pat your head while adding a column of numbers.
    {True, very true, but you don't have to sit with your head in your plate either

    There are times that you don't have the choice in sitting at a round table in the middle of the restaurant with your back to the door. Just saying.

    But you again keep your self aware of what's going on around you.

    I'm 10 years younger than Old Timer and relate to going out at night. I do carry and I'm not happy and uncomfortable if a gun is not close at hand.

    That is how a reasonable and wise man thinks. Even if you are a generation
    behind me.

    But the one thing I have in my corner is growing up in the slums of Chicago, doing
    things that I regret and am ashamed of, but taught me some valuable lessons on
    survival.

    Leave a comment:


  • thawmytongue
    replied
    To echo TSiWRX's sentiments, Kershaw has some great offerings at very decent price points. I have had Leeks and Scallions which are great knives. Their ZT line is very robust. I don't think I ever will break my 0350. It locks up like a fixed blade and feels like you could pry out nails with it.

    I also have a few Case pocket worn folders for my more refined times. Those are sharp and hold an edge. I just have to be careful of no lock on the blade. Although it is not really YOUR knife until it "kisses" you. :lol: I have more scars on my hands...

    And back to the gunfight thing... A gunfight is any situation where I should have a gun. I don't care what the other guy has.

    Leave a comment:


  • color of law
    replied
    Situational awareness is easier said than done. Anybody that says they are aware of their surroundings at all times is blowing smoke. Multitasking, rub your tummy and pat your head while adding a column of numbers.

    There are times that you don't have the choice in sitting at a round table in the middle of the restaurant with your back to the door. Just saying.

    I'm 10 years younger than Old Timer and relate to going out at night. I do carry and I'm not happy and uncomfortable if a gun is not close at hand.

    Leave a comment:


  • tsiwrx
    replied
    "Don't bring a knife to a gun fight" is a gross misrepresentation of such a scenario.

    A lot depends on distance, and that ties in directly with situational awareness.

    The canonical Tueller Drill is a perfect example of the dangers of underestimating the effectiveness of a contact weapon at closer distances, and when one realizes that the "Tueller Drill" assumes a defender who knows what is about to happen and is primed to respond and is pairing said individual with an aggressor who has been instructed to "stop when hit," it is all too optimistic of an outlook.

    If I knew I was going to be in a gunfight, I would choose not to be in one. If I had no way not to be there, I'd bring a rifle. I'd wear some armor. I'd bring a few similarly armed friends. :lol: It's a crystal ball setup, ain't it. :wink: :lol:

    "Bringing a knife to a gunfight" assumes that both participants know what's about to happen: that's not the way that most violent encounters occur in the real world. Don't underestimate the bodily-harm capabilities of even a 2-inch blade wielded by even an untrained or inebriated individual. Do not underestimate the potential for harm of *any* contact weapon, just because you are armed with a firearm does not guaranty your safety. It is not an amulet.


    -----

    Sorry for the thread derail! ops: Just a topic that I feel very strongly about, that's all. After getting my face bashed in enough times in similar force-on-force scenarios, I've come to realize the dangers in being "tool driven" in terms of one's outlook on self-defense. Solve the problem, first - if that means beating feet or going hands-on until you can access the right tool for the job, then do so.

    To get back to the OP:
    Does anyone carry or use SOG fixed blades?
    or CRKT folders?

    I like the SOG line as well as some of the Gerber's when
    it comes to all purpose fixed blades. At least I can still
    afford those.

    SOG's fixed blades aren't bad. Compared against their folders, I think that their fixed blades are actually worth the dollar amount asked for them, whereas their folders have always subjectively felt a little "cheap" to me. I've got a couple of SOG folders that I've picked up as impulse/circumstance buys or simply to fill-out a purchase, and despite the fact that they work well enough, they just feel lacking compared against price-similar competition.

    Have you looked at the ESEE knives?

    CRKT and Kershaw folders both continue to impress me at their price-points.

    Leave a comment:


  • old timer
    replied
    Back in the 60's 70's and 80's I use to carry. But the laws have changed
    since then, and so have the costs. So at my age and shape don't see a real
    need to be armed again. The only time I have one with me is if I'm on a
    buying trip or have my family on the open road.

    Can you explain that a little more for me? In my case the desire to carry has increased with age, not lessened. In my fifties now and although life experience has heightened my situational awareness, the youthfulness leaving my body has brought me to the conclusion that I could not handle physical confrontation without some sort of "equalizer" like back in my twenties and thirties.

    No problem. I'm in my Mid-70's seldom go anywhere that might require the
    use of deadly force. Travel mostly daylight hours, no more bars, clubs, Big
    time events, or places that offer a hot shot Y-generation type a chance.
    Ergo no real need. I'll grant the fact one ever knows when the feces might
    hit the fan. But the odds are I won't be there went it does. That plus the
    fact I'm to slow to pull off a fast draw from an open carry. That and most
    places frown upon a 12 Ga. riot gun draped over my shoulder.

    Hope that answers your question.

    BUT I have been known to go outside the house at night
    when a would be prowler thought he had an easy target,
    his eyeballs where a helluva lot bigger than the opening hole
    on that old 1911 .45 ACP.

    Leave a comment:

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